space exploration

Water found 1 in. beneath Martian surface could help future astronauts

When the first astronauts land on Mars, they won't be able to take everything they need with them. The logistics and weight of transporting so much material on one spacecraft, along with a crew, defies current technology. While scientists at NASA have discussed missions to deliver materials to the Red Planet ahead of a manned mission, there may be resources on Mars that can be used.

Jeff Bezos's Blue Origin launches 12th test flight

Blue Origin, the stealthy company founded by Amazon's billionaire founder Jeff Bezos, just launched another test flight of its tourism rocket as it steadily inches toward sending paying customers into space.

NASA mission catches asteroid ejecting material into space

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission arrived at near-Earth asteroid Bennu a year ago, and the spinning top-shaped space rock has been full of surprises. The latest findings now classify it as an active asteroid with observable events happening on the surface.

The Mars 2020 rover lands February 2021

When the Mars 2020 rover lands on the Red Planet in February 2021, it will touch down in Jezero Crater, the site of a lake that existed 3.5 billion years ago. Now, two research teams have identified areas in Jezero Crater where the rover might find signs of ancient life.

How you can watch the International Space Station fly by

The International Space Station orbits the Earth 16 times a day, giving space gawkers several chances to wave to their neighbors in the thermosphere. Because of its relatively close proximity to Earth, it can be viewed with few resources and the right timing.

Apollo astronaut investigates massive landslide on Mars

About 47 years ago, Harrison Schmitt became the only scientist to ever walk on the moon. Now, the geologist and professor is studying an extensive landslide on Mars, almost 250 miles wide, that formed about 400 million years ago.

Is this how we'll live on Mars?

What would a home on Mars look like? What sort of clothes would we wear on the Red Planet? And how would we grow our food? The answers to some of these questions are beautifully imagined in a new exhibition, "Moving to Mars," at London's Design Museum.