software and applications

25 Jewish members of Congress call for Stephen Miller's firing

Twenty-five Jewish Democratic members of Congress are calling on President Donald Trump to remove senior White House adviser Stephen Miller from the administration based on leaked emails that showed he promoted stories from white nationalist and fringe media organizations.

Mining company coached Alaska's governor to lobby White House

A mining company secretly collaborated with the governor of Alaska to lobby the Trump administration to move forward with a mining project that Environmental Protection Agency scientists warned could devastate the world's most valuable wild salmon habitat, according to newly released emails obtained by CNN.

From Instagram to TikTok: How social media evolved this decade

Shortly after midnight Pacific time on October 6, 2010, a new app built by a small team went live on Apple's App Store. Right away, they noticed people abroad signing up for the app, called Instagram; by 6 a.m. the startup was so overwhelmed with traffic that its servers reportedly melted down.

Remember HQ Trivia? It's trying to make a comeback

HQ Trivia brought joy -- and some cash -- to millions of people, but despite the game's virality, the start-up behind it struggled. Now, that company, HQ, is trying to make a comeback with new games and a subscription service.

Using machine learning to help at work

Technology is a blessing and a curse for the modern office worker. Lightning-fast computers make the impossible possible. But constant distraction and friction slows work down.

Nintendo Switch heading to China

Nintendo is teaming up with Tencent to launch its popular Switch console in China, but it may have a tough time winning over gamers more used to playing on their mobiles.

Homeland Security wants to use facial recognition on US citizens, too

UPDATE: US Customs and Border Protection, which is overseen by the Department of Homeland Security, said Thursday that it is no longer seeking a regulation change that would have enabled it to use facial-recognition technology to identify all people entering and leaving the United States, including US citizens. The change follows CBP consultation with Congress and privacy experts.

Tech firm finds talent in unexpected places

When Mike Norris graduated from Baltimore's Stevenson University with a degree in business information systems, he thought he'd quickly nab an entry-level tech job. Instead, he found himself working as a security guard patrolling parking lots, earning $7.50 an hour.

The Nintendo Switch was Black Friday's big winner

Gamers are getting excited about the next generation of PlayStation and Xbox. But those won't come out until next holiday season. In the meantime, the Nintendo Switch is reaping the rewards of video game players holding out for new gaming systems.