Student survivors from room 112 recall the 77 minutes from the Robb Elementary School massacre

“I saw most of my friends pass, and I saw my best friend dead and I saw my teacher, Mrs. Mireles, screaming and crying because she didn’t want to die, she was trying to, she wanted to talk to her daughter,” says Khloe Torres, a room 112 survivor.

UVALDE, Texas – In Uvalde’s Robb Elementary school massacre, a teen gunman killed 19 children and 2 teachers in the fourth-grade classrooms. In one of those classrooms, room 112, eight students died along with two teachers.

Some of the students in room 112 survived. Now fifth graders, those students were inside room 112 for the full excruciatingly long 77 minutes as they watched and listened to their friends and teachers get murdered.

“I saw most of my friends pass, and I saw my best friend dead and I saw my teacher, Mrs. Mireles, screaming and crying because she didn’t want to die, she was trying to, she wanted to talk to her daughter,” says Khloe Torres, a room 112 survivor.

Miah Cerrillo, with a visible scar on her shoulder from a bullet, put the blood of another student on her body to appear dead.

“You smeared blood from another victim and put it on your skin?” asks documentary filmmaker Charlie Minn.

“Yes,” says room 112 survivor Miah Cerrillo.

“And who was that?” asks Minn.

“Makenna,” replies Miah.

“Makenna, who passed away?” asks Minn.

“Yes,” replies Miah.

“If you didn’t smear Makenna’s blood on you, do you think you’d be alive today?” asks Minn.

“No,” replies Miah.

Another student hid under a nearby table.

“I was hiding under a table, and there was a table curtain, so the shooter wouldn’t see me, and the table curtain was black,” says Room 112 survivor Jaydien Canizales.

Other students were hit by bullets.

“I got shot right here, on this area,” says AJ Martínez, room 122 survivor, as he points to his leg.

Numerous 911 calls came out of room 112, but it took law enforcement over an hour to take down the shooter.

“I think some more students and one teacher would have survived because the police were just waiting outside but they had to call some other people to come in because they were too scared, the police were too scared to go in,” says Khloe Torres.

These students were hurt physically and some have scars, but they’re also dealing with mental trauma.

“How often do you think about this?” asks Minn.

“A lot,” replies Room 112 survivor Jordan Olivares.

“I think about my best friend almost every day, Amerie Jo Garza,” says Khloe Torres.

These interviews were a part of a Charlie Minn documentary that 25 News Now assisted with, the film, ‘Robb-Ed’ may come out as early as this year.

To see previous reporting on this click here.