March Military Hero: Louisa Rosalez

The US Department of Veterans Affairs recognizes the month of March as Women’s Veterans Month, with women making up around 16 to 19 percent of the United States Military.

VICTORIA, Texas -Louisa Rosalez is your Military Hero for the month of March.

Rosalez was born and raised in Corpus Christi. She joined the United States Army Reserves in 1986 and ended up serving for 20 years. When she arrived at Fort Dix in New Jersey she was welcomed with a blizzard. Then in 2001, like many in the service, her life would change.

“When 2001 hit…that changed everything,” says Rosalez.

She left for Iraq Easter Sunday 2003.

While in Iraq she’d work in administration overseeing and coordinating the soldiers who would leave for rest and relaxation.

While in the service she would meet her husband too.

“We were both in the same unit, and that’s how we met, both my husband and I. I have the rare privilege of being a female veteran but also the spouse of a veteran so I know what it’s like on both sides of the coin,” says Rosalez.

Going to war was not an easy task but Rosalez knew she had to serve her country.

“I never thought that I would get to see, in my lifetime, I never thought I’d get to see war, the day that we were flying out to Iraq, my husband had said that war changes everybody,” says Rosalez.

Coming back to the states wasn’t easy either, she felt like she had lost her family while in the service, but Rosalez was able to overcome it.

“Once you experience it it’s something that never goes away, we just learn to manage it,” says Rosalez.

And for any other veterans who experience PTSD, her advice is to not suffer alone, that help is there.

“Seek help. The VA’s got great programs for this. Also, if you’re not comfortable going through the VA, still try to seek help as much as possible,” says Rosalez.

The US Department of Veterans Affairs recognizes the month of March as Women’s Veterans Month, with women making up around 16 to 19 percent of the United States Military.

“Unfortunately for many women who stay in the military many women are one of the least recognized veterans in the community because we ourselves are the stigma because we don’t advertise it as much as men do. But we women also want to be recognized for our contributions to the military. Women have been in the military for hundreds, if not thousands of years,” says Rosalez.

And she’s got a special message for all the women out there.

“If you feel that you cannot make a change then that’s incorrect. We as women can make a positive impact on those that are coming in, the younger generation” says Rosalez.

In her free time, she is the Senior Vice Commander for the VFW, serving in that role for over five years. She and her husband have 2 sons and a daughter, so they stay busy with them and their grandchildren.

You may even find her on her motorcycle. She and her husband are active in the Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association.

And you can’t forget her many fur babies.

“Hello, say this is Chula, this is Gizmo, say hi babies, this one is Feisty, this is her daughter Abby,” says Rosalez. Along with her other cat Vin Weasel.

Click here to nominate a Military Hero.