Technology

Medieval murder map reveals deadliest crimes

There were many ways a person could meet a violent death in medieval London, from violent mob punishment (for littering eel skins) to getting wounded in a fracas (by a servant shooting arrows into a crowd).

Research: Males may be more likely to become gaming addicts

Brain scans of men addicted to online gaming show changes in the brain regions associated with impulsivity, new research presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America finds. But no brain alterations are seen in addicted women, said the authors of the small study who compared the scans of addicted men and women to healthy volunteers.

'Roma' leads streaming push into Oscar race

Netflix desperately wants to make its mark on the Oscar race, and in Alfonso Cuaron's autobiographical "Roma," it has its strongest contender yet. Yet the streaming service -- having roiled the TV business -- appears determined to storm the movie-awards competition in similar fashion, which means breaking rules and operating very much on its own terms.

Planes may hold the secret to safe self-driving cars

The self-driving car industry has an irresistible sales pitch: Its technology can prevent car crashes and save thousands of lives. But there's one major nagging problem. No one has proven the utopian promise will come true.

Why Amazon's HQ2 might be better for New York than for Virginia

Amazon has pledged to bring 25,000 jobs that pay an average of at least $150,000 a year to both New York and Virginia in its East Coast headquarters expansion — but the big question is whether that prosperity will be limited to those with Amazon badges.

'Wreck-It Ralph' hopes to break virtual reality, too

The "Wreck-It-Ralph" sequel is titled "Ralph Breaks the Internet," but the Disney franchise will break ground in virtual reality, too, as the first VR experience that the VOID has offered based on an animated property.

Trump defends daughter Ivanka amid email scrutiny

President Donald Trump acknowledged Tuesday that his daughter and senior adviser Ivanka Trump did use private email during the start of the administration, but declined to acknowledge any hypocrisy over his criticism during the 2016 campaign of Hillary Clinton's similar practice.